(Image / Royal BC Museum Facebook)

The Royal BC Museum has launched a new webinar series aimed at learners of all ages, in an effort to keep British Columbians connected to culture while still practicing physical distancing.

The museum officially shuttered its doors on March 17th due to rising coronavirus concerns, and in response has developed the three online programs named RBCM@Home, RBCM@Home (Kids), and RBCM@Outside.

The programs are meant to appeal to people of all ages, anywhere in the province, and are entirely free to watch.

“The Royal BC Museum sees the temporary closure as an opportunity to think creatively about how we can serve our communities,” said Royal BC Museum CEO Prof. Jack Lohman.

“We have leapt at this chance to connect museum experts with citizens in an informal and accessible way, whether you are at your kitchen table, balcony or back yard.”

The webinars will be streamed live on Zoom and on the museum’s Facebook page. Each one will also be recorded and uploaded to the Royal BC Museum’s YouTube channel later that week.

The webinars offered and their schedules are as follows:

  • The RBCM@Home program is designed for youth and adults, and will feature members of the curatorial and collections staff that are working from home. It will take place every Tuesday and Thursday at 12 p.m.
  • This kids version of RBCM@Home is meant to be like an online museum playdate. It will also consist of museum members who are working from home, along with other families from across B.C., for the chance to learn and make together. It takes place every Wednesday from 11:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
  • RBCM@Outside is a collection virtual field trips to local destinations. This series is still in development, and the museum’s event calendar will be updated with times.

“This free web series is a great opportunity for parents searching for ways to keep their kids learning while schools are closed,” said Lisa Beare, Minister for Tourism, Arts and Culture.

“I commend the Royal BC Museum for this initiative to bring British Columbia’s culture and history to people’s homes.”