(File photo)

A new study conducted by Canadian research group, Research Co., has found that over half of all British Columbians want to see lower speed limits in residential areas.

The survey found that 58% of BC residents would “definitely” or “probably” approve of speed limits being reduced to 30 km/h on residential streets, while keeping the limit on main arterial roads at 50 km/h.

See also: Province lowers speed limits on three Vancouver Island highway segments

While survey respondents from across the province generally shared support for the policy, the study found that Vancouver Island residents and middle-aged women were the most unified proponents of a lowered speed limit.

In total, a steady 60% of Vancouver Island residents were in favour of the policy change, while 63% of all the respondents who were in favour a lowered speed limit were women aged 35-54.

Meanwhile, when respondents were asked if they ever spotted cars speeding in their residential neighbourhood, 42% of British Columbians say they see a car speeding “at least once a day,” while 16% say it “never” happens.

See also: Dashcam captures reckless driver going at an insane speed on the Malahat (VIDEO)

Currently, the city of Vancouver is testing a traffic pilot project that has reduced the speed limit of some residential streets to 30 km/h.

The pilot project began in early 2019, and the survey found that 66% of respondents thought the new policy was a “very good” or “good idea”, while 22% found it “bad” or “very bad”.

In her campaign for re-election last year, Victoria mayor Lisa Helps stated that she planned to implement lower speed limits on all local neighbourhood streets, bringing them down from 50 km/h to 30 km/h.

The survey collected the opinions of 800 adult British Columbians between May 26-28, 2019.