(BC Green Party leader Sonia Furstenau/Twitter)

BC Green Party leader saw a large spike in popularity after the televised debate on Tuesday, but her party’s appeal remains stagnant, according to a new poll.

The Angus Reid Institute says that Sonia Furstenau saw a huge jump in personal appeal in a poll they conducted from October 14 to 15.

In a question that measured if voters found each leader “very” or “quite” appealing, 46 per cent favoured the Green Leader.

That’s an increase of nearly twenty points from October 1 to 3, when Furstenau scored 27 per cent for favourable views.

However, the Green Party’s fortunes don’t appear to be rising along with their leader. Angus Reid found that 14 per cent of decided and leaning voters intend to cast votes for the Greens, unchanged from their earlier poll.

John Horgan still enjoys the most overall support, 54 per cent saying they find the NDP leader “very” or “quite” appealing, and 49 per cent saying they intend to vote orange.

Andrew Wilkinson continues to struggle on a personal and electoral level, with only 24 per cent finding the Liberal leader appealing and 33 per cent looking to cast votes for his party.

Angus Reid says that the Green Party is the overwhelming second choice of most voters, with 34 per cent saying they could vote Green compared to 14 per cent for the NDP and 11 per cent for the Liberals.

A whopping 60 per cent of NDP voters say the Green Party would be their second choice in this election.

“The challenge for Sonia Furstenau and the Green Party is clear over the final week – convince BC NDP supporters to shift their allegiance,” the Angus Reid Institute stated.

The Angus Reid Institute conducted an online survey from Oct 14 – 15, 2020 among a representative randomized sample of 801 British Columbia adults who are members of Angus Reid Forum. For comparison purposes only, a probability sample of this size would carry a margin of error of +/- 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20. Discrepancies in or between totals are due to rounding. The survey was self-commissioned and paid for by ARI.